Project Makeover: Refinishing a Chest of Drawers (Part II) {Tutorial}


33 comments
{The Saga Continues}
After stripping and sanding the chest of drawers down to the bare bones - or as far down to the bare bones that I was willing to go - it was time to get it painted.  I knew all along I was going to use chalk paint and in most cases, I've seen the paint distressed.  That's not the look I was going for.  Typically you wouldn't have to prime the furniture first when dealing with chalk paint, but I chose to because I wanted to ensure an even coverage and I could still see a red tint to the wood that I believe was a type of stain.  I wanted that sealed underneath the chalk paint, so I chose to prime.

Let's just say that painting in 100 degree heat is no joke, BUT, before you finish the second piece, the first piece is dry!  Within an hour, perhaps, the entire dresser and drawers had been primed with about two coats of primer in certain places.

You know what?  I bought a 5 gallon bucket of prime and I've been using that for every painting project I've done in my home.  Keep the lid on tight and you can use this baby forever (well, for a really long time).


{Making the Paint}
I searched online for chalk paint "recipes" and finally decided to use the one Yetunde used because I wanted a thicker paint to camaflouge the imperfections of my furniture piece.  Most chalk paints require 1 cup of paint to 2 tablespoons of an additive (i.e. unsanded grout, Plaster of Paris, baking soda).  I opted for the 2:1 ratio, so I used 2 cups of paint and 1 cup of unsanded grout.  (More on this in another post.)

{Painting the Pieces}
Applying the chalk paint was a fairly simple task.  The paint is thick, and a little really does go a long way.  The trickiest part was probably making sure I had enough coverage for the grooves in the furniture.  Those are probably the same places other diyers decided to distress their pieces.

I will admit that I thought I saw a tinge of that red coming through and so just to be sure, I'm stopped dead in my tracks and reprimed everything.  Yes, even over the chalk paint!  Better be safe than sorry.

So, I mixed up another batch of chalk paint and got started again.  I was very pleased with the results.

FYI:  I even primed over childhood memories.  I almost decided not to, but I think it looks better now.  Can you see my stick figures and simple addition?  I guess I was bound to teach?


Oh yes, and I painted the hardware.  How could I forget that?


{The Big Reveal}

Yes, I even lined the drawers with contact paper from the Dollar Tree.
 
And finally, the pièce de résistance
I will be adding casters to the legs of this piece, but because of the nature of it, the casters I purchased were only big enough for the back two legs.  I hadn't noticed that the front two were shaped differently.

So the before and after shot....


You like?

Materials Used:
Valspar Satin Paint (Color:  Crisp Linen made by BHG) - Lowe's scanned the color and mixed my paint
Zinnser Bullseye Primer
unsanded grout
Brushed Metallic Nickel Spray Paint (Satin finish)

If you missed Part I of this project, click here.

Also, if you haven't entered into my giveaway, check it out here.


Oh My DIY



Happy Renovating,


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33 comments:

  1. Wonderful! It is a little sad you had to cover your figurines but on the other side they are primed and protected now, only hidden and waiting for another sanding process in the future. :-)

    Did you make any tutorial about lining drawers so nicely? I am going to need that.

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    1. It was sad. On the inside of the drawers I had written labels of what should go in that drawer. It's funny to see my handwriting from so long ago.

      I actually have to line a few more drawers so I will do a tutorial on that for you. :-) Hey, aren't you supposed to be at the beach?

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  2. You did a super job on that piece Libby! Your room is going to look FAB with this piece in there. :)

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    1. Thanks, Kar. That one piece has forever changed the personality of the room. I'm getting excited to finally be able to work in there. :-)

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  3. Love it! It looks wonderful. Great job! The hardware looks wonderful, and how could I not like the drawer liner? I have the same paper in my butler's pantry.

    I'm very curious about the paint, so I'll be eager to read that upcoming post. Does the paint seem textured? It doesn't look like it. I'll just have to wait until you post about that!

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    1. With the 2:1 recipe, the paint is very textured. I'll be sure to post some upclose photos on the chalk paint post so you can see. :-)

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  4. Libby! You are so talented - I wish I could even think about doing projects like this, let alone actually attempting them! I'm way too scared, but you make it look so easy, and completely rewarding. Such a beautiful dresser - Hello Pottery Barn!!

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    1. Thank you so much! The project really wasn't *difficult*; it was just time consuming. Plus, it's been really hot so it made me have to take a billion breaks in between work sessions. Sometimes I only worked like 15 minutes and was like, "Ok, that's it for today!" lol

      You know, I've heard so much about the Pottery Barn, I guess I have to see what it's really like in that place. I've never been. Shameful, I know. :-)

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  5. wow very nicely done!! my daughter has been wanting to paint over an old dresser--we were seriously thinking of just painting right over it--no sanding or anything--guess you wouldn't recommend that :)

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    1. I probably would have done just like my dad and painted right over it, but that had already been done and the paint was uneven in places so sanding was my best option. If you're not doing a chalk paint and the dresser you have is painted then I would say sand it for sure. But if you're using chalk paint, sanding is not required because the paint is thick and gritty.

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  6. I am reading this while I watch my paint dry for the paint project I am working on. It's so appropriate.
    I do have a door that I need to paint that has too much chipping. I am thinking of using a sander, but reading is gives me another idea. Another friend warned me about the paint removal, that it was like a cancer, it just kept spreading and made another issue (the cancer reference REALLY made me stop in my tracks on my way to Home Depot). While another friend said no the sander makes too much dust. UGH!! the guy at Home Depot (after describing the issue) recommended a sander (under $30) that I could use, "Naw, you can do this!".
    This long paragraph asks how did you do the stripping sander, paint remover, both?
    Good Job Libby, there is make-over excitement in the air. Thanks for posting.

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    1. Oooh, Cassandra. You raised a good issue. I will admit that I told Lowe's what I was doing before I got started. They just recommended a stripper. Then after reading more online, I thought, "what if this is lead" but I had already gotten started so I kept on. I figured that if my dad had originally started stripping this, then it was okay. *fingers crossed* Now, if I had to do it again, I would recommend getting a lead test before removing the paint. I haven't actually seen this in person, but again, I saw it online.

      As for what I did:
      I started out using the Tuff-Strip spray. I think this is good on small projects, but for what I had to go through, it didn't work out. So I moved to the Jasco remover, which is a gel form. You paint it on and when the paint bubbles, you scrape it off with a plastic putty knife. Seriously, you need to do this outdoors if possible, but I had to do mine indoors so I wore a mask and goggles and turned on the fans. Oh yeah, and wear gloves.

      After I got off as much as I possibly could, I knew I would have to sand, not because of the wood being rugged, but because I couldn't get off every stitch of paint. I used (grade 80) sandpaper and a sanding block, but purchasing a small sander would have been even better to ensure a smooth final coat. Next time. Trust me, this piece has a companion - a dresser with a missing mirror. Now that I've done the chest of drawers, the dresser can't forever remain like that. I know it's potential. :-)

      I hope this helps and if you have any questions, ask away!

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  7. I love the look of chalk paint but haven't tried it. This piece is beautiful!

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    1. Thank you, Ginger! You should give chalk paint a try. :-)

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  8. Wow! You did an amazing job Libby! The dresser looks brand new! Great idea to add casters.

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    1. Thank you, Val. I hope I can find some casters soon. Otherwise I'll have to use those EZ sliders in the meantime. Not as cute.

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  9. Awesome job Libby!!! You should start doing commercials for HGTV!!! It looks brand new and my personal favorite is the contact paper from the dollar tree. =] Very creative touch.

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    1. Hey Frank! You are to funny with your ongoing HGTV ideas. Warms my heart though. Thank you so much. :-)

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  10. Wow! Good job! My father refinishes furniture, so he taught me how to do it. :-)

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    1. What a fantastic skill he taught you. I know it must come in handy! Thanks for stopping by my blog. :-)

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  11. OMG, I am Kvelling! That looks simply amazing! You have the patience I never had to really take my time, and it shows in your result. Simply mahvelous!

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    1. Girl, you know you're one of my craft inspirations! Thank you so much for answering all my questions along the way. :-)

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    2. you are quite welcome, and no problem at all!

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  12. Well, this is simply GORGEOUS! Great job! I love the interior fabric...and I noticed the color! :) We have DO matching rooms!

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  13. WOW. That is so beautiful! Well worth the effort! I have a few pieces I'd like to paint and I think you just gave me the nudge. :) Love the inside of the drawers; nice touch!!

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  14. Libby! I love the dresser and the story... I still have the two pieces my mom did for me.. they are in our daughters room.... waiting for their ' third " transformation!
    I adore painted furniture..! Thanks for sharing! Deb

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  15. It came out beautiful! that's my favorite trick to stick the hardware in cardboard or styrofoam to get all the sides covered, & I love the patterned lining in the drawers!!!
    thanks so much for sharing another fab find at www.mercyinkblog.com
    blessings,
    lauren

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  16. Great job!! I love the lining as well, such a big pop of colour and such a gorgeous pattern!

    Love this little dresser, you did really well!!

    xox

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  17. Wow Libby - this dresser looks great! I'm going to email you with some questions as this is one of the projects on my list of things to-do :)

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  18. HI Libby, thank you for stopping by A Bubbly Life. I love the way your dresser came out- so beautiful!!

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  19. And there she is! Gorgeous!! Thank you for sharing this at my Make it Pretty Monday party at The Dedicated House. Toodles, Kathryn @TheDedicatedHouse

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